When should I switch my lab to senior food?

When should Labs be switched to Senior Food? Well, the easy answer is when they reach seven years old. I have seen many cases of older dogs having great vitality and quality of life on a good high-quality puppy or adult food, but there are some obvious signs your dog may be experiencing the effects of aging.

About 50 percent of all large breed dogs show clinical signs before seven years of age. You may notice that your Lab is beginning to get up more slowly, not wanting to go on walks or runs, not able to chase after balls like he used to, getting loose in the house when you are gone during the day, not able to jump onto higher surfaces anymore, or simply panting more.

Many senior dog foods have higher protein which can help keep your dog’s weight steady while slowing down the digestive process to keep things flowing smoothly, but you should consult with your veterinarian before making any changes.

Older Dogs and Allergies

Many older dogs are affected by allergies. In fact, allergies are the number one reason for visits to the vet in older dogs. Just like with people, allergies can cause a range of issues in older dogs, from itchy skin and ears to vomiting and diarrhea.

The good news is that there are a number of treatments for allergies in older dogs. The most important thing is to identify the allergen and then work to eliminate it from your dog’s environment.

When should I switch my laboratory to senior food?

If your puppy has digestive problems, such as loose stools, switch the switch a little slower. When large and giant breed puppies grow too fast, it can put stress on developing bones and joints and increase the puppy’s risk of orthopedic problems in adulthood. These growing large breed puppies should be fed a diet of specially formulated large breed puppy food, such as the American Journey large breed puppy food.

Complete food for older pets is developed with your pet’s life stage in mind and tailored to help your dog get all the nutrients needed to live a happy and healthy life.

Older dogs are more prone to constipation, which is why older diets contain around 3 to 5% more fiber.

When should I switch my dog to food for older dogs?

If you have a small dog, it’s a good idea to look for a small breed senior food (and the same goes for larger breeds). Many dog food companies make dog food with “senior” in the name, or labeled for the “senior lifetime. In contrast, switching to a lower quality brand at this stage of your dog’s life can disrupt their digestive system and not provide them with the same level of nutritional quality they grew up with.

Once you’ve selected the right diet for your older dog, it’s important to switch to the new food gradually.

Older pets may need to be adjusted so they can move around, exercise, and live their best life as a senior.

Summary

Labradors are an example of a breed of dog that should be switched to senior food at the age of seven. Around 50 percent of all large breed dogs show clinical signs before seven years of age, so it’s important to be aware of the changes your dog may be experiencing.

There are many signs that your dog may be reaching old age, such as not wanting to go on walks or runs, not being able to jump up onto higher surfaces, getting loose in the house when you’re gone during the day, and panting more.

Many senior dog foods have higher protein which can help keep your dog’s weight steady while slowing down the digestive process to keep things flowing smoothly. You should consult with your veterinarian before making any changes

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