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How To Clean Your Labs Ears?

You’re in the right place if you want to know how to clean dogs’ ears. You’ll learn about several methods and what you’ll need. It’s a good idea to clean your dog’s ears regularly to keep them clean and healthy.

The Labrador’s ancestors were wolves with upright, pointed ears. Due to their large open ear canals, their ears were practical in terms of hygiene, and they acted as the perfect antennae and helped them stay healthy and clean.

The Labradors Flopped Ears

Germs thrive in the Labrador’s flopped-over ear, which traps dirt, ear wax, and all kinds of daily grime. Labradors can have too much hair inside their ear canals, which can cause blockages and make it hard for wax to come out.

You could get even more problems if you cut this hair. The small ear canals of some Labradors make the wax more likely to get stuck and cause health problems. You’ll keep your dog happy if you keep his ears clean.

If you’re lucky, your dog’s ears never need cleaning, but in other cases, they do. Every week, check your dog’s ears. It’s time to clean your dog’s ears when they look grubby.

The first thing you need to do is get some supplies. You’ll need:

  • dog-friendly ear cleaner or simple, clean water
  • cotton balls or gauze squares
  • treats to reward your dog

Your vet can recommend a good ear cleaner for your dog. Never use human ear cleaners on dogs. They can be too harsh and cause irritation.

How To Clean Your Labs Ears

You can clean your Labrador’s ears using warm water, cotton wool pads, or special ear cleaning chemicals. When you’re ready to clean your Labrador’s ears, set out the equipment and ask him to sit before you, with his head in your lap.

To remove visible dirt and waxy buildup, lift your dog’s ear flap and wipe it with cotton wool. The ear canal shouldn’t be filled with water or cotton wool.

Special Ear Cleaning Solution

Whenever your vet gives you an internal ear cleaning solution, follow the instructions carefully and wipe out any excess cleaning solution from the inside to the outside of the ear canal.

It’s common for your dog to run around the room shaking his head or rubbing his ears. Nothing to worry about. Give him a treat when he’s done, and he’ll soon associate ear-cleaning with something positive.

If you’re not comfortable cleaning your dog’s ears, or if they seem sore, red, or inflamed, take him to the vet. They can check for infections and clean out his ears properly.

Teach You Dog From A Young Age

Some dogs don’t like cleaning their ears, so it’s best to start them young.

New puppy?

Here’s what to expect. Call your dog and stroke around his ears whenever your Lab responds, and give him a small piece of kibble. As he gets older, you can start to gently insert your finger into his ear and give him a kibble when he doesn’t pull away.

When your dog is older, you should be able to wipe his ears with no problem. If your dog is resistant to cleaning his ears, try not to fight him on it.

Training a reliable sit command can help if your dog hates having his ears cleaned or checked as he ages. Move your hands closer to his head and ears, rewarding him for staying calm.

What Does An Ear Infection In A Lab Look Like?

Ear infection in a dog might look like a sticky discharge, redness, inflammation, and rubbing of the ear on surfaces. If your dog is trying to shake his head a lot, has lost his balance, or is walking in circles, he may also have an ear infection.

If you think your dog might have an ear infection, take him to the vet for a check-up and treatment. Never try to clean out an infected ear yourself.

What Are Ear Mites?

An ear mite is a tiny parasite that feeds off shed skin cells, ear wax, and oils. Most Labradors are healthy, but their ears can be a problem. The most common sign that your dog has ear mites is shaking its head or scratching its ears. If you think your dog has ear mites, take him to the vet for treatment.

Conclusion

Labradors are prone to poor ear health, so watch out. Ensure your dog’s ears are clean at home with a cotton swab and warm water, and use only specially formulated canine ear cleaning solutions. If you’re unsure about anything, take your dog to the vet.

FAQ

Q: How can I prevent my dog from getting an ear infection?

A: The best way to prevent your dog from getting an ear infection is to keep his ears clean. Wipe them out with a cotton swab and warm water, or use a specially formulated canine ear cleaner.

Q: What should I do if I think my dog has an ear infection?

A: If you think your dog might have an ear infection, take him to the vet for a check-up and treatment. Never try to clean out an infected ear yourself.

Q: What are ear mites?

A: Ear mites are tiny parasites that feed off shed skin cells, ear wax, and oils. Most Labradors are healthy, but their ears can

Q: Can your dogs´ ear infections be cured without antibiotics?

A: In some cases, ear infections can be treated without antibiotics. However, if the infection is severe, your dog may need to be seen by a veterinarian and might require antibiotics.

Q: What are the most common signs that my dog has an ear infection?

A: The most common sign that your dog has an ear infection is shaking, scratching, or rubbing his ears. If you think your dog has an ear infection, take him to the vet for a check-up and treatment.

Q: What is the best way to clean my dog’s ears?

A: The best way to clean your dog’s ears is with a cotton swab and warm water or a special canine ear cleaner. Never put anything in your dog’s ear canal, such as Q-tips, as this can damage his ears.

Q: Is there a home remedy for curing your dog’s ear infection?

A: There is no home remedy for curing your dog’s ear infection. If you think your dog might have an ear infection, take him to the vet for a check-up and treatment.

Q: What should I do if my dog scratches his ears?

A: If your dog scratches his ears a lot, it could indicate an ear infection. Take him to the vet for a check-up and treatment.

Hi, my name is Jane Davis and I love dogs. In fact, I own a labrador retriever named Max. When I was growing up, we always had dogs at our house. They provide us with such unconditional love and companionship, and I can't imagine my life without one by my side.